preload
May 01

Being an Austinite, I enjoyed having DockerCon local and co-authored a guide to visiting Austin in the hopes that attendees would enjoy having DockerCon in Austin as well. During this installment of Dockercon, a few major announcements were made, including the Moby Project. So, what is the Moby Project? It’s a framework to assemble specialized container systems without reinventing the wheel.

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
Apr 30


A collection of industry analysts convened to share their thoughts on DockerCon 2017. Watch and listen to the virtual panel debriefing on DockerCon 2017.

Did you attend DockerCon or watch the keynotes remotely? What did you think of DockerCon 2017?

Tagged with:
Sep 16

glen-canyon

Originally published on The New Stack on Sept. 4th, 2016.

There are two proposed standards for configuring network interfaces for Linux containers: the container network model (CNM) and the container network interface (CNI). Networking is complex, and there are many ways to deliver functionality. Arguments can be made as to which one is easier to adopt than the next, or which one is less tethered to their benefactor’s technology.

When evaluating any technology, some important considerations are community adoption and support. Some perspectives have been formed on which model has a lower barrier to entry. Finding the right metrics to determine the velocity of a project is tricky. Plugin vendors also need to consider the relative ease by which plugins may be written for either of these two models. Continue reading »

Tagged with:
Sep 14

container-rope

Originally published on The New Stack on Sept. 4th, 2016.

While many gravitate toward network overlays as a popular approach to addressing container networking across hosts, the functions and types of container networking vary greatly and are worth better understanding as you consider the right type for your environment. Some types are container engine-agnostic, and others are locked into a specific vendor or engine. Some focus on simplicity, while others on breadth of functionality or on being IPv6-friendly and multicast-capable. Which one is right for you depends on your application needs, performance requirements, workload placement (private or public cloud), etc. Let’s review the more commonly available types of container networking.

There are various ways in which container-to-container and container-to-host connectivity are provided. This article focuses primarily on a breakdown of current container networking types, including:

  • None
  • Bridge
  • Overlay
  • Underlay

Continue reading »

Tagged with:
Previous Entries