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Jun 08

Construction Containers (source: Hans).

Originally published on June 1st, 2017 by Brian Anderson of O’Reilly

I recently sat down with Lee Calcote, head of technology strategy at SolarWinds, to talk about the benefits of container networks. Here are some highlights from our chat.

What is container networking? How are people deploying container networks?

Much of what container networking is today revolves around core Linux network technologies, whether that be iptables for port-forwarding, firewalling and network address translation, or ipvs for load-balancing and service abstraction (virtual IP addressing). These battle-tested technologies are old friends of systems engineers, who have leveraged these kernel capabilities as they’ve built container engines and orchestrators.

To date, container networking has largely been focused on simple network services like connectivity, IP addressing (IPAM), (domain) name services, and load-balancing. Beyond connectivity, most higher-level network services—like quality of service (QoS), virtual private networking, security policy (complex and dynamic firewalling), and topology optimization—are still emerging. So far, connectivity has largely equated to use of Linux bridges and network overlays, with VXLAN being a popular protocol. These common choices are in the face of a style of networking that’s arguably more straightforward in its approach: layer 3 networking.

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Apr 25

The Prometheus AlertManager component handles alerts sent by client applications such as the Prometheus server, carefully de-duplicating, correlating, and routing their notifications to their appropriate receiver (e.g. email, webhook, etc.). Current behavior of this component is only to display actively firing alerts.

Contributing to Prometheus is no different than most other open source endeavors, which, like many projects, welcomes community contributions. Let’s gain better familiarity with the process by augmenting Prometheus’ AlertManager with a new “history” view.

This talk was presented at CloudNativeCon + KubeCon EU 2017.

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Mar 31

An active and engaged community is a key marker of success for any open source project. Presented at CloudNativeCon + KubeCon EU 2017, this talk analyzes various open source communities and how they create and sustain communities to build and use better software. This session contrasts the communities of Openstack, Apache, Android, OpenDayLight, OpenNFV, Cloud Foundry, Mesos, etc. and highlights best practices of each in order to learn from and be inspired to build great CNCF communities. Open source communities use various means like meetups, hackathons, roadshows, day events, mini projects, college drives, etc. to attract and engage contributors and users. As the CNCF starts adding more projects in to its fold, the user base also needs to grow.

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